Diabetes Community/Physicians Forum

Here the Diabetes Daily Post has put together a community based interactive forum for both, Diabetes Patients and Diabetes Physicians. This is a great way to communicate with each other in a way that shares your experiences and knowledge with the entire Diabetes Community. This is a members based community so registration is required. All forum activity is moderated by the Diabetes Daily Post.

Welcome Guest 

Show/Hide Header

Welcome Guest, posting in this forum requires registration.









Pages: [1]
Author Topic: Have Diabetes? Don’t Ignore Your Foot Problems
michaelham-
m

Newbie
Posts: 1
Permalink
Post Have Diabetes? Don’t Ignore Your Foot Problems
on: February 28, 2013, 02:04
Quote

Peripheral Neuropathy is one of the common side effects of diabetes, which can cause insensitivity, or a loss of sensation in the extremities to feel pain, heat, and cold in a diabetic person. It is very important for a diabetic person to take care of foot related injuries and wear specially designed shoes for diabetic.

Diabetic foot problems have become common throughout the world today. People with diabetes are quite at risk of developing many different foot problems. Even the ordinary foot problem can become painful and can lead to serious complications. Minor injuries can easily become major infections among diabetics so it is always advised not to avoid your foot problems.

Diabetes and foot pain are very closely related, and foot pain can be taken as the warning sign of diabetes. Diabetes can limit blood supply to your feet and cause a loss of feeling. Proper foot care with wearing diabetics shoes is very essential for a diabetic person, as wounds to the feet may take much longer to heal. Therefore, it is very important to prevent them in the first place. So a diabetic person is always advised to do a routine self-inspection of each foot.

As the connection between diabetes and foot problems is clear, there are hundreds of diabetic footwear options available in the market. These diabetic shoes for men are designed in such a way so as to provide complete support to the feet while also helping in improving the circulation and blood flow. Choosing and wearing proper fit diabetic shoe, complete with custom insoles, can prevent the feet from injuries and further irritation. By wearing diabetic shoes on a regular basis, you can make sure that your feet won’t have complications in the future. Diabetic footwear plays an important role in helping your feet, even if you are taking good care of your health getting your sugar levels checked regularly.

A healthy diet along with regular exercises with men’s & women’s diabetic shoes is vital for all the diabetic people in order to improve one’s cardiovascular health, improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Always remember that making some small changes in your life if you have diabetes can surely help you to reduce your blood sugar levels for a longer run.

You should consume diabetes specific food available in the market that can help you in reducing the impact of diabetes by helping to regulate your blood sugar. You are also advised to have a carbohydrates free diet to prevent diabetes in the future. A healthy eating plan, exercise and medication on the regular basis can help a diabetic person live a healthy, happy and fit lifestyle.
Image
Image
Image

Pages: [1]

Mingle Forum by cartpauj

Version: 1.0.34
;
Page loaded in: 0.012 seconds.
1 Comments
  1. Myth #1: Carbohydrates are bad for you.

    All carbohydrates aren’t alike. Easily digested carbohydrates, such as those from white bread and white rice, if eaten often and in large quantities, may add to weight gain. But carbohydrates are also found in fruits, vegetables, beans, and dairy products; and these deliver essential vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Diabetes carbohydrates also give your body energy and help keep organs functioning properly.

    A system called the glycemic index measures how fast and how far blood sugar rises after you eat a food with carbohydrates. White rice, for example, is almost immediately converted to blood sugar (glucose), causing it to rise rapidly, and so has a high glycemic index. Whole grain bread is digested more slowly, making blood sugar climb more slowly and not as high. It has a low glycemic index. Whenever possible, select carbohydrates that is whole grain, such as whole grain bread, whole wheat pasta, and old fashioned oats.

    Myth #2. Vegetables mainly add fiber to your diabetic diet foods.

    Vegetables are excellent sources of fiber and they supply vitamins and minerals, with very few calories. Orange vegetables like carrots, and dark leafy greens, such as spinach and collards, are good sources of vitamin A, an important nutrient to keep your eyesight keen, your skin healthy, and your immune system strong. Broccoli, pepper, and tomatoes are full of vitamin C, which promotes healing and keeps keep ligaments, tendons, and gums healthy. And beans and lentils supply potassium, which enables the body to convert blood sugar into glycogen, a stored form of energy that’s held in reserve by the muscles and liver.

    Myth #3: To get calcium in your diabetic diet, you have to consume dairy products.

    Milk, yogurt, and cheese are rich in calcium, which is important for building and protecting bones, Calcium Sources but they’re not the only sources of this mineral. Today, many foods are fortified with calcium, including orange juice, soy milk, breads, and cereals. Other nondairy sources of calcium are canned salmon and sardines with bones, collard greens, broccoli, and almonds. If you find it difficult to get enough calcium from your diet, you can also take calcium and glucose supplements.
    Food for Type 2 Diabetes – Nutrition Mythbusters

    Myth #4: Meat, chicken, and fish are the best sources of protein.

    Foods with protein help your body build muscle and tissue, and provide diabetes vitamins and minerals. Animal sources—meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products–have what’s called complete protein, that is, they contain all the amino acids needed to build new proteins. Proteins from fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts are called incomplete proteins—they’re missing one or more amino acids. But animal sources of protein have their drawbacks: red meat and poultry skin are high in fat, especially saturated fat (a healthy diabetic diet plan should have less than 10% of calories from saturated fat). If you eat meat, stick to lean cuts, chicken with the skin removed, and fish. If you want to try vegetable sources of protein, try beans, nuts, and whole grains.

You must be logged in to post a comment.