Learning About Periodontal Health and Diabetes.

Periodontal Health and Diabetes

mandentistaPeriodontal disease is a severe form of gum disease. When gum disease (unusual redness of the gum) which is caused by colonized bacteria in the mouth not addressed by brushing and flossing will lead to gingivitis (hardened tartar caused inflammation in the gum). If not treated in time, it develops to periodontal disease (inflammation around the tooth and start to separate ).

What is taking place in our body when in periodontal stage

As bacteria invade to the the gap left by the separation of gum tissue around the tooth, Body will response with our immune system. However, our immune system start to show weakening effect at this stage because of the exhaustion caused by gum disease and gingivitis, the predecessors of periodontal disease. Biochemically speaking, in periodontal stage the cytokines releasing cascades including powerful toxin called TNF-alpha is released and cause uncontrollable inflammation around the teeth and blood vessels carry these toxins circulating in our body and incurring damages. Studies have shown these cytokines especially TNF-alpha is one of the culprits and may be one of the most destructive ones for inflammation related diseases such as diabetes, heart diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and even cancers. Diabetes patients will be effected more than non-diabetic population because diabetes patients usually have a weak immune system to start with and vulnerable to complications as a result.. In summary, periodontal disease causes early tooth loss, weakens our body’s defense, disrupts blood sugar level, increase risk of heart attack and causes rheumatoid arthritis to worsen. Periodontal disease if not treat could add risk to more severe diabetes complications including renal failure and amputation.

Gum disease early signs

Bad breath
Redness in gums
Bleeding gums
Painful when chewing
Unsecured teeth
Sensitive teeth

Diabetes patients be aware

Chronic gum diseases can disrupt diabetes control
Smokers with diabetes have 20 times the risk in tooth loss compared to non-smokers
Type 2 Diabetes patients are 3 times more likely to develop periodontal disease than health individuals
Diabetes patients have more risk in developing “tartar”

ABC’s in preventing periodontal disease if you are a diabetes patient

A Have you teeth cleaned twice a year

B Brush your teeth with soft to medium tooth brushes three time a day

C Floss, floss and floss

Written by Diabetesdailypost.com contributor

Jorge Cornellis, DDS

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